~The First Honey Run 2014~

Maggie, Marisa and Silvana getting ready to work.

Maggie, Marisa and Silvana getting ready to work.

Our first honey harvest of the season yielded 320 pounds which is a good start and a very pleasant surprise! We pulled off 9 supers and tested out our new equipment.  Fred purchased a Dakota  Gunness 200 Decapper and Dadant 60 Frame extractor and we were very pleased with the way they worked.

Our Dakota Dunnick Wax Decapper.

Our Dakota Gunness Wax Decapper.

Decapper and 60 frame extractor in the background.

Decapper and 60 frame extractor in the background.

The honey is very light and super delicious!  I’m not sure when we will be harvesting again but at least now we know how to run the equipment.  Enjoy the photos.

Marisa prepares the smoker using hay which we kept going for awhile.

Marisa prepares the smoker using hay which we kept going for awhile.

 

Loading the  12 gauge just in case the Badger shows up.

Loading the 12 gauge just in case the Badger shows up.

This is our best hive this year.

One of our best hives this year.

 

Beautiful hive near our garden.

Beautiful hive near our garden.

 

 Brushing off the bees gently before we load the super.


Brushing off the bees gently before we load the super.

 

Hauling the 35# box to the car.

Hauling a very heavy, medium sized super  to the car.

 

Checking the super to make certain all the honey bees are gone.

Checking the super to make certain all the honey bees are gone.

This is a bee escape board which is placed right below the supers we plan on removing 24 hours before we harvest.  This allows the bees to travel down but not come back up into the honey super.  Most of the bees are out making it much easier.

This is a bee escape board which is placed right below the supers we plan on removing 24 hours before we harvest. This allows the bees to travel down but not come back up into the honey super. Most of the bees are out making it much easier.

 

Transporting honey home to be extracted.

Transporting honey home to be extracted.

 

A field of Sweet White clover.

A field of Sweet White clover.

 

More Sweet White Clover for the bees.  Beautiful!

More Sweet White Clover for the bees. Beautiful!

A second 60 frame extractor which is stored outside.

A second 60 frame extractor which is stored outside.

We ran a few frames through the new wax decapper and Fred made some adjustments.

We ran a few frames through the new wax decapper and Fred made some adjustments.

The frame of honey enters the machine.

The frame of honey enters the machine.

The frame comes out the opposite site with the caps removed.

The frame comes out the opposite side with the wax caps removed.  It took a couple of times to set the spinning chains properly.

60 Frames are loaded into the extractor.

60 Frames are loaded into the extractor.  This starts to spin slower and picks up speed rapidly forcing the honey out.  Works really great!

Beautiful honey being extracted. Light and delicious!

Beautiful honey being extracted. Light and delicious!

Raw, unfiltered honey enters a holding tank.

Raw, unfiltered honey enters a holding tank.

The honey gate is opened and the raw honey is filtered.

The honey gate is opened and the raw honey is filtered.

 

We’re looking forward to a good honey harvest at the end of August or so.  There was plenty of rain in the beginning of the year and things are looking good.  Now as I prepare this post we are receiving a very much needed rain of more than an inch or two.  Talk about feeling blessed.  WOW  The hives located at our home farm here are thriving on the clover which is taking over 🙂   We are thankful to have some good equipment to make the work easier.  Soon we will haul a shipment of honey into Brad’s Market in Minneota.  Stay tuned!

 

 

 

 

 

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About Callens Honey Farm

We live on a small family farm located in S.W. Minnesota, near the South Dakota border. The source of our honey is from white and red clover. The honey appears as liquid gold in color. Our honey is extracted using a hand cranked centrifugal force extractor. Then the honey is screened once into a holding container from which we later fill the small honey bottles. We do not heat treat the honey nor add any other ingredients. Pure and natural is our Minnesota honey! What could taste better?
This entry was posted in BEE NEWS AND UPDATES and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to ~The First Honey Run 2014~

  1. Jackie says:

    This is amazing, Dolly.. I thought it was so interesting, especially with the pictures.. Thank you for posting…

  2. cukierski says:

    Love you guys.. you inspire me!

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